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The little black book of dating secrets review guide

the little black book of dating secrets review guide-85

This book is the first to explore the history of a powerful category of illicit sex in America's past: liaisons between Southern white women and black men.

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When I graduated from College in 2012, and was thrust outward into the real world, I was expecting the future to look bright- blindingly bright, for that matter.It wasn't that I wasn't informed it would be a challenge, but being told and experiencing are naturally two different things. Way too focused on a heterosexual, religious, and business-oriented type of life.When I first saw Paul Angone's book, it was because my girlfriend had just received it by mail. Needless to say, a person like me who doesn't fit any of these categories was often more irritated than comforted/stimulated by these advices.An era of terror and lynchings was inaugurated, and the legacy of these sexual politics lingered well into the twentieth century.Every twenty-something needs a little black book of secrets.And normally, italicized or boldfaced words and phrases are meant to add emphasis, but in this book nearly every single paragraph is given some special treatment, and it looks silly.

Some of the ways the author tries to inject humor I to his "secrets" is often far-fetched and draw out to the point where it just isn't funny.

It's also encouraging to continue going down the road when you know it'll still be tough fives years ahead, and that's not (as far as I'm concerned) something that can be known by yourself. Break ups suck, but that's where those friends come in handy. I wish I could have given this book 2.5 stars, because my feelings about it were smack dab in the middle of the road. Angone was funny, and his advice didn't seem preachy. Also, there were some moments where I was completely thrown off because I was reading something humorous, and then God happened, and then it was serious. Because Paul Angone tells it like it is in an easy-to-read, almost blog-like format.

Sometimes it takes a friend, or a book, to remind you that life has its lessons that it will need to throw at you. The book is broken into 101 chapters, some as short as one paragraph, others as long as three to four pages.

When it does, you will know how to catch it, because in a way you already know how. I wish I could have given this book 2.5 stars, because my feelings about it were smack dab in the middle of the road. Angone was funny, and his advice didn't seem preachy. Each chapter is a secret; a little life-lesson on how to get through your twenties.

From chapters on how to make friends in your twenties (harder than it sounds!

Our twenties are filled with confusion, terrible jobs, anticipation, disappointment, cubicles, break-ups, transition, quarter-life crisis, loneliness, post-college what the heck, moderate success sandwiched in-between complete failure, and we need a worn, weathered guide stashed somewhere close by to help shed so Every twenty-something needs a little black book of secrets.